recreational water

recreational water

Climate Change and Drought

Drought is a prolonged dry period caused by less than normal rainfall or snowfall for an extended period of time. Drought can lead to water shortages, meaning there is less water available for drinking, food production and swimming. It can also lead to other impacts such as poor water quality and more wildfires. Drought can affect our physical and mental health as well as the local economy. Drought conditions sometimes take years to develop and can last as short as one season or as long as many decades.

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Blue Green Algae

The Vermont Department of Health Laboratory works closely with state offices and public water suppliers to monitor Lake Champlain and drinking water supplies for blue green algae toxins.

Lake Conditions

Not all Vermont bays, lakes, and ponds are monitored. Be aware of changing conditions, and keep out of the water if you think cyanobacteria may be present. Check recent reports on lake conditions and season summaries. To find out if a beach or swim area is open, call the beach manager.

Climate Change and Waterborne and Foodborne Diseases

Heavy rains can wash contaminants into drinking, recreational and irrigation waters that can make people sick. Harmful contaminants include human and animal waste, industrial chemicals, oil and other fuels, pesticides and fertilizers. Heavy rains can also result in overflows of combined sewer systems, which are designed to treat both stormwater and wastewater at the same time. During heavy rains, there may not be enough capacity in the system, leading to the discharge of untreated or partially treated wastewater. Flooding can make all of these problems even worse.

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