Hepatitis

Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver. The liver is a vital organ that processes nutrients, filters the blood, and fights infections. When the liver is inflamed or damaged, its function can be affected. Heavy alcohol use, toxins, some medications, and certain medical conditions can cause hepatitis. However, hepatitis is often caused by a virus. In the United States, the most common types of viral hepatitis are hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C.

In This Section

The hepatitis A virus is spread when someone ingests the virus during close, person-to-person contact or when someone eats or drinks something that is contaminated with hepatitis A virus.

This page offers information and resources for providers about hepatitis A vaccination and actions requested.

The hepatitis B virus is spread when blood, semen, or other body fluids from an infected person enters the body of someone who is not infected.

People can live with hepatitis C virus for many years without symptoms, and it’s possible to transmit the virus to others while asymptomatic. The virus is primarily transmitted through blood-to-blood contact, but sexual transmission is also possible.

This page offers information and resources for providers about hepatitis C surveillance, reporting, and who should be tested.