Where to Get Tested

Where to Get Tested

UPDATE: As of June 25, Health Department testing sites have closed.

  • Take-home antigen tests meet many testing needs and are widely available at pharmacies around the state and at online retailers. If the tests are covered by your health insurance, you may be able to show your insurance card at the pharmacy counter and get test kits at no cost to you. Some health plans may require you to pay for the tests and then be reimbursed.
  • Make sure you have ordered all three rounds of at-home tests from COVID.gov, which are mailed directly to you.
  • You can also reach out to your health care provider or local pharmacy for other types of testing.
  • If you cannot access antigen tests through a pharmacy, health care provider or insurance, you can call the Health Department at 802-863-7240, option 8, or check with your local health office.

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Non-profit community organizations who work with Vermonters who are Black, Indigenous or people of color (BIPOC), speak languages other than English, are experiencing homelessness, have a disability or other groups who may have difficulty getting tests due to overall systemic inequities can reach out to the Health Department to see if they qualify to receive free rapid take-home tests (antigen and LAMP) by mail. Please email [email protected]

Testing is recommended for people with symptoms, and close contacts of someone with COVID-19 who are not up to date on vaccines. Please report your self-test results (positive or negative) to the Health Department using this online form, Vermont COVID-19 Self-Test Result Reporting Form. If there is an option to automatically report your results, you can use that.

Learn about what to do if you test positive

Learn more about test types

  • An antigen test can be used if you have symptoms or if you are a close contact, but be sure to take BOTH tests, at least 24 hours apart.
  • An antigen test should be used if you tested positive for COVID-19 in the past 90 days, because the other test types could continue to be positive due to your previous infection.
    • You may be able to show your insurance card at the pharmacy counter and get the antigen at-home test kits at no cost to you. In some cases, you may need to pay for the kits and be reimbursed.
  • A PCR test is needed if you are testing a child under age 2. LAMP and antigen tests are not approved for use in children under 2.
    • If needed, you can receive a PCR test through your physician's office.

If you were tested at a Health Department site (prior to June 26):
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